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CRASH COURSE: 5 Ways to Protect Your Film Against Porn Piracy

CrashCourse Adult Film Piracy

The proliferation of pirated ‘free’ porn has saturated the Internet, creating a lower perceived value of adult content with less income for studios — this makes running a sustainable business difficult, especially for new directors who might not yet have a loyal audience base.

Here’s a few ways to prevent piracy and protect your work:

  1. Make it as easy as possible to pay for porn. This means everything from making sure you’re promoting your films (with working links!) to offering your content on a variety of platforms. The easier it is to purchase, the less invested someone will be to seek it out for free. If you want to make your work accessible to folks with low income, consider offering a trade in exchange for volunteer work. (Industry secret: reviewing porn is a great way to get free access, and provide helpful promotion for filmmakers. But remember, the best way to support your favorite pornographer is with your wallet.)
  2. Make it as hard as possible to rip your movies. If possible, avoid downloads and DVDs in favor of streaming content. (If you’re wondering why PinkLabel has a permanent streaming library instead of digital downloads, this is why! We strive to protect our studios against piracy.)
  3. Seek out pirated copies of your work. Create Google Alerts with your name and film title, and periodically browse tube sites. You can also try searching for your own films using other search engines, and utilize image and video searches, including words like ‘free,’ ‘tube,’ and ‘download.’ Torrent sites are less damaging than tube sites where the majority of people seek free porn. (Be careful of malware!)
  4. Issue takedowns. When you find your work pirated, report the URL to your attorney. If you don’t have a lawyer, you can use a DMCA template to request your content be removed. (The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) is a US copyright law that protects intellectual property.) You can find the owner or contact information in the footer of the site, or otherwise by using a Who Is look-up (ie: whois.net).  Learn more in this article by Red Light Legal. Some companies like TakeDownPiracy also provide this service. (A tip: PinkLabel filmmaker Nikki Silver (NaughtyNatural) shares that it can help to hire a friend to look for your pirated work as it can be emotionally upsetting. Great advice!)
  5. #PayForYourPorn! Participate with the online campaign and educate your viewers about the damaging nature of piracy for producers and performers. Encourage the promotion of affiliate links for your cast and crew, so that everyone prospers from each sale. Try Boodigo.com for ethical porn searches — the crowdsource site only scans pay sites. It’s what the web search results could look like if we all valued porn.

Have more tips? Leave a comment below.

Photo credit: CrashPad’s Guide to Fisting

Posted August 2, 2017

4 responses to “CRASH COURSE: 5 Ways to Protect Your Film Against Porn Piracy”

  1. Nodachi says:

    #2 really is counterproductive!
    Might as well read “make it as hard as possible for your customers to use the content they’ve just easily paid for”

    All it takes is always only *ONE* determined person to rip it, and from there it spreads fast and far. You’ll never reach a point where your distribution is 100% technically airtight. (If Amazon and Netflix couldn’t do it, don’t worry, you can’t either…)

    Finding downloadable content on the internet however will always produce the most freedom of use for users, if not the easiest way to procure the content.

    With piracy control, would it be porn or otherwise, one rule always applies: carrot works, stick doesn’t!

    • PL says:

      When we find pirated content of filmmakers who are on PinkLabel (thanks to taking steps like Google Alerts and searching tubesites) the content is always stolen from a site that allows downloads. Therefore, our system of providing streaming and permanent libraries — like Amazon and Netflix do — helps to keep content off tubes. While you’re correct that the determined will always find a way, we can still do our best to work within popular consumption models to protect creative content.

      • Nodachi says:

        My general point is really about ease of use.
        Netflix works well as an example of streaming done right, because there’s an app for your TV, your watch and everything inbetween. That made Netflix easier to use than most ways to find pirated content (while keeping the price reasonable).
        Amazon in that regard is already less successful and suffers more for it because they chose to keep their app off certains platforms (AppleTV…)

        Adult sites will never have this kind of streaming availability and ease of use, because adult apps will never be allowed in app stores.

        Now, of course you can find pirated content from “download enabled” sites, sure. But being streaming only will not make it impossible to be ripped, ever.
        On the other hand, you will not attract subscribers by punishing them with technical restrictions.

        I’m currently a subscriber for 6 different adult sites and have been to about 10~12 in total in my life, but I would never consider subscribing to a stream-only site. Limiting access to a browser is too much of a constraint. If I have no way to watch a movie (and that includes a porn film) on my TV, I’m not interested.

        Case in point (and close to home); streaming on crashpadseries.com (of which I’m a subscriber) does not work with Firefox for instance.

  2. […] We believe that ethical porn production goes hand-in-hand with ethical consumption. We work to protect content from piracy on free tube sites where work is often reposted without the consent or benefit of those involved, […]

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